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Just created a #LEGO Brickheadz figure of my girl and me. Super happy with the result! https://t.co/t4JkJsukYT

1 month ago

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Tomorrow: #meetup @wehkamp! Pizza. Beer. Subject: #meetup with chatbots. Get your own running in 5 minutes!… https://t.co/5yrtRlICxf

2 months ago

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Trying to learn some #Python3 👊. Made a palindrome detector: https://t.co/pcWQOYGyCI "A man, a plan, a canal – Pana… https://t.co/pcWQOYGyCI

2 months ago

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How to do proper dependency injection with IOption support in .NET Console apps? It not that hard! ♥️#csharp https://t.co/cfGSYUMc5K

3 months ago

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Windows

Swap alt and cmd in Windows 10 (MacBook Pro)

As a .Net Developer, I need my MacBook Pro to run Windows. I did so using Boot Camp (which was okay, but my mouse wouldn’t scroll) In Windows I use alt+tab a lot. But the cmd and alt keys are not in the right place (from a Windows keyboard perspective). I use the Windows key a lot too (like Windows+r for run). So let’s swap those keys!

.NET

Part 2: Calculations with Roman Numerals using C#

In a previous article I wrote how to parse Roman Numerals in C#. This article will focus on how to calculate with the class in an intuitive way. It will show how to implement implicit casting and the add and subtraction operator overloads. Fun stuff that’s probably useful in other projects.

.NET

Part 1: Parsing Roman Numerals using C#

Lately I’ve become fascinated with the Latin language. I’m working on a project that converts photographs of Latin inscriptions on medieval statues into translated text. One of the challenges is parsing years, usually expressed in the form of Roman Numerals.

After building a parser class I noticed that it had a lot of nice characteristics: parsing, operator overloading, implicit conversions. A nice way to play around with C#.