JavaScript

JavaScript

JavaScript is a high-level, interpreted scripting language that conforms to the ECMAScript specification. JavaScript has curly-bracket syntax, dynamic typing, prototype-based object-orientation, and first-class functions.

To some JavaScript is a necessary evil. I think JavaScript code can be elegant and beautiful. As with any programming language, it has its traps and pitfalls. Node.js is a big game changer on the server. And TypeScript helps u to make projects more readable.

Strongly Typed Events 0.3.0 – now with Signals
Strongly Typed Events 0.3.0 – now with Signals
Strongly Typed Events, TypeScript

Strongly Typed Events 0.3.0 – now with Signals

Turns out that I needed an even smaller type of event: the signal. It is an event that has no data; it just fires. The Strongly Typed Events project started with the IEvent event that was styled after .Net. Then the ISimpleEvent was added in 0.2.0, for scenarios when no sender is necessary. Now I’ve added the ISignal to version 0.3.0.

Strongly Typed Events 0.2.0 – now with Simple Events
Strongly Typed Events 0.2.0 – now with Simple Events
JavaScript, Strongly Typed Events, TypeScript

Strongly Typed Events 0.2.0 – now with Simple Events

A while ago I started a GitHub project for Strongly Typed Events in TypeScript. I’ve uploaded the second version (0.2) with support for ISimpleEvent and I changed the way you can expose the dispatcher as an event. The code is 100% backwards compatible with version 0.1 – you might need to update some references.

Using strongly typed events in TypeScript with interfaces (Part 2)
Using strongly typed events in TypeScript with interfaces (Part 2)
Strongly Typed Events, TypeScript

Using strongly typed events in TypeScript with interfaces (Part 2)

In a previous tutorial I explained how events can be implemented as properties on a class using Strongly Typed Events for TypeScript. Let’s explore how these work on interfaces. Interfaces work a little different, because they don’t have getters and setters on them (at least nog in TypeScript 1.8). Let’s explore how these work on interfaces.

Login Credentials Generator – in JavaScript
Login Credentials Generator – in JavaScript
Html, JavaScript

Login Credentials Generator – in JavaScript

Many small applications need to store user credentials, but it’s hard to create a good username/password infrastructure. What if you could just use a small XML file with credentials that don’t actually stores the password, but just a hash and some salt.

For a small cloud project I ended up creating such a solution. This blog explains how to generate the credentials that can be stored in the XML. The aim is to make a solution that works on the client using JavaScript.